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March 18, 2017

Should Christians Support School Choice?

With Betsy DeVos heading the Department of Education, the issue of school choice has taken center stage.  Some say Christians should oppose school choice because it will weaken the public schools.  Others say Christians should support it because it enables parents to escape the indoctrination offered in public schools. This Saturday on Up For Debate, Julie Roys will explore the issue with EdChoice Friedman Fellow Greg Forster, who supports school choice and All Our Children Founder Lallie Lloyd, who opposes it.

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IN THIS EPISODE

Greg Forster
Greg Forster

Greg Forster

Greg Forster, Ph.D. serves as the director of the Oikonomia Network at the Center for Transformational Churches at Trinity International University. He has a Ph.D. with distinction in political philosophy from Yale University. He is the author of six books, most recently Joy for the World: How Christianity Lost Its Cultural Influence and Can Begin Rebuilding It (2014), and the co-editor of three books. He is a senior fellow at the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice; has published numerous articles in scholarly and popular periodicals; speaks at large conferences like the Gospel Coalition and Jubilee; edits the group blog Hang Together; and contributes regularly to other online outlets. His primary scholarly interest is studying how the structures of culture and civilization (family, work, education, business, politics, etc.) respond to the challenge of the gospel and the ambiguous tensions of religious freedom, in order to equip the church to be good citizens of both the Kingdom of God and our human communities.

Lallie Lloyd
Lallie Lloyd

Lallie Lloyd

Lallie Lloyd worked for education justice in philanthropy and consulting for twenty years before founding the All Our Children network, a partnership between congregations and public schools. She is a lay leader in The Episcopal Church, a former deputy to General Convention, and has served on policy and ministry commissions at the local, diocesan, and wider church levels. Lallie graduated from Yale College, the Wharton School, and Episcopal Divinity School, where she received the Hall Prize for outstanding peace and justice work. Lallie has three adult children and lives on Cape Cod with her husband.

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Julie Roys

Julie Roys has become a trusted voice on the Moody Radio Network, earning an audience through her reasoned and biblical discernment of difficult cultural issues.  Since 2012, Julie has been hosting Up For Debate , a show that initially launched on WMBI in Chicago, but now airs on about 150 stations nationwide.  Julie also is a sought-after speaker and blogger and has written articles for WORLD Magazine, Christian Post, Boundless, Good News Magazine, and the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood Family Channel. Julie came to Moody Radio in 2007, after taking a 13-year hiatus from broadcasting to raise her children and serve in youth ministry. Prior to that, Julie worked as a TV news reporter for a CBS affiliate in Indiana and as a newswriter for WGN-TV and Fox News in Chicago.  She holds a bachelor's degree in history from Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL, and a master's degree in broadcast journalism from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL. Julie and her husband, Neal, live in the Chicago suburbs and have three children.

Up for Debate

Many issues are not debatable within orthodox Christianity—the virgin birth, the veracity of the Scripture, the bodily resurrection of Christ. However, some issues are. For example: Can a Christian join the military and support a war? Should Christians advocate for environmental causes? Is it okay to use in-vitro fertilization? Up For Debate seeks to equip believers to discern these debatable matters by engaging biblically with people holding diverse opinions. Each week, host Julie Roys invites two guests onto the one-hour program to defend opposing views. She also encourages listeners to call in and add their comments and questions. The views expressed on Up For Debate do not always represent those of Moody Bible Institute. However, Moody wholeheartedly affirms the means the show uses to evaluate these views. Like the Bereans mentioned in Acts, Julie and her guests examine the Scriptures, seeking which positions most closely align with God’s Word. By doing so, Up For Debate develops in listeners what British essayist Samuel Johnson termed “expert discernment”—the ability “to tell the good from the bad” and “the genuine from the counterfeit.”